Volunteerism

Critical Knowledge Gap Exists Between Foundations and Nonprofits, Report Finds

Publication date: 
09/2013
Nearly 50 percent of nonprofit leaders believe a critical knowledge gap exists between foundations and the organizations they fund, a new report from the Center for Effective Philanthropy finds. According to the report, What Foundations Can Do (24 page, PDF), 48 percent of the nonprofit leaders surveyed by CEP believe that foundations are unaware of the challenges their organizations face.
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What Makes a Good CSR Leader?

Publication date: 
09/2013
Recently, a group of CSR leaders gathered under the auspices of the LBG Research Institute to discuss the matter, and the resulting short report (titled Advancing CSR Without a Corporate Responsibility Officer) lists a number of attributes that the group feels are critical for success.
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More Companies Offering Paid Time Off for Volunteering, Report Finds

Publication date: 
08/2013
According to an annual survey of employment benefits conducted by the Society for Human Resource Management, 20 percent of survey respondents offered a volunteer benefit to their employees, a number that has been increasing since 2007. The report, 2013 Employment Benefits (88 pages, PDF), suggests that the practice is driven by a perception among employers that their millennial-generation employees — those born after 1980 — value volunteering for their favorite causes over cash donations to nonprofits, as well as by a sluggish economy that has taken a bite out of corporate philanthropy budgets.
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More than Just Charity – Rethinking Corporate Philanthropy

Publication date: 
08/2013
Corporate philanthropy has historically involved employee-matching programs, community days, and grant-giving. While these programs are certainly needed and much-appreciated, McKinsey notes, “in a majority of cases, CSR has failed to fulfill its core purpose—to build stronger relationships with the external world.” They leave employees, like my friend, wanting to do more, and communities needing more.
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The Many Benefits of Establishing a Culture of Giving

Publication date: 
07/2013
There is a lot of discussion about the importance of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and its impact on local communities, a company’s image and even its bottom line. There is an area, however, though equally significant a component as the others, that is often overlooked in this conversation. That is the way in which CSR strengthens a company’s culture and offers associates (employees) at all levels an opportunity to become more engaged.
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The Unrealized Potential of Workplace Giving

Publication date: 
07/2013
We are not providing an effective outlet for employees’ philanthropic energy, and this is cause for concern. Employees want to give, and the statistics show that they are giving in great numbers and to great effect. Companies have long recognized the value of providing employees with opportunities to make donations to charitable organizations through the workplace. In many cases, companies will even match employee donations up to a certain amount (for example, up to $10,000 per year). But not enough giving is happening through the workplace.
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Flexible and Genuine: Building a Strong Signature Program

Publication date: 
06/2013
he 2013 CECP Summit: Ahead, Together, brought chairs of foundations, CEOs, and corporate responsbility experts to NYC to discuss how to make corporate giving more effective. At a session on June 4, Eva Tansky Blum, EVP & Director of Community Affairs at PNC Bank and Lori Forte Harnick, General Manager for Citizenship & Public Affairs at Microsoft shared their insights during Adapting Signature Programs to New Realities, a panel moderated by Carol Cone, Global Practice Chair of Edelman Business + Social Purpose for Edelman.
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Independent Sector's Value of Volunteer Time

Publication date: 
04/2013
The value of volunteer time is based on the hourly earnings (approximated from yearly values) of all production and non-supervisory workers on private non-farm payrolls average (based on yearly earnings provided by the Bureau of Labor Statistics). Independent Sector indexes this figure to determine state values and increases it by 12 percent to estimate for fringe benefits. Charitable organizations most frequently use the value of volunteer time for recognition events or communications to show the amount of community support an organization receives from its volunteers.
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